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  • Overwhelmed by Your Health Data? Here’s How You Can Take Control

    With the latest Apple Watch measuring heart rate and Fitbits measuring every step we take, the presence of health data tracking technology today seems practically ubiquitous. This technology is allowing people to understand their own bodies more than ever before with the help of just a few taps but, for some people, this information overload can have a more confusing than helpful effect.

    According to the CDC, 7.3 million women in the U.S. experience fertility issues, and those who use self-tracking technology face multiple challenges. Just as our bodies are so unique, so are people’s responses to this technology. Many find it helpful to gain insights into where their body is at in their cycle, how their temperature impacts the timing of their ovulation, and how different supplements affect them. Others, however, can feel overwhelmed by the amount of information they are presented with and don’t know where to start. Without clear guidance, these feelings can lead to frustration and even hopelessness.

     

    In a recent Huffington Post article, two researchers detailed their findings on how women’s use of fertility tracking technology generally falls into five categories:

    • Positive - users are eager to see data and anticipate results
    • Burdened - usually caused by a large amount of data being tracked that causes stress, but users are generally still positive about the process
    • Obsessive - tracking data occupies a large portion of the user’s attention leading to higher levels of frustration
    • Trapped - may occur when users have been trying to conceive for a considerable amount of time but don’t feel like they can discontinue tracking
    • Abandoning - when tracking becomes emotionally burdensome and negative results lead to frustration, so users stop tracking temporarily or permanently

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  • How to accurately time a Progesterone test

    Your doctor may have suggested that you have a progesterone test to confirm ovulation or to assess your progesterone levels in the luteal phase.

     The main test to determine whether a woman is ovulating is by a blood test, which assesses the level of the hormone Progesterone. Progesterone increases in the blood stream following ovulation and reaches it’s peak at 7 days before the next menstrual period. This test is termed a 21-day Progesterone test and is performed on day 21 of a 28 day cycle.

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  • Buying OvuSense was a main 'game changer' in my fertility journey!

    From an OvuSense User: "I have to agree, buying OvuSense was the main game changer in my fertility journey.  Without it, I wouldn't have been given the diagnostic tests I have had.  My consultant asked me this morning, "How's the 'egg' (meaning OvuSense) going?"  I showed him my charts from...
  • Interested in fertility reflexology? Half price consultation for OvuSense users!

    My name is Julia Mclellan and I’m a holistic therapist.  I help women (and men) every day with fertility.  I'm here to tell you more about what I do and how I can help you on your fertility journey.  For OvuSense Users, I am offering a special deal too!

    I’ve recently done my specialist training in fertility, maternity and baby reflexology and I’m so excited about the future of these therapies, especially fertility reflexology (Reproflexology) which could help so many people struggling to have their babies and to avoid the IVF route.

     

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  • PCOS - kiss my A**! I'm pregnant with OvuSense baby number 2!

    Ladies, it is with pleasure that I am over the moon to tell you all that I am pregnant again. Baby No. 2 is on the way, due March 2018!  I conceived with OvuSense 3 years before this after 18 years of trying.

    I knew I was from my Ovusense chart, sadly and annoyingly I missed a week of using it! I really want to know what happened in that gap but the end result is the same. ❤️

    Doctors said I'd never have children without IVF...pfffft. Prolactinoma, screw you. PCOS, suck it. MTHFR, kiss my Ass!

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  • Secondary Infertility – The Facts

    What is Secondary Infertility

    Secondary infertility is a common problem. The term secondary infertility refers to the inability to become pregnant or the inability to carry a pregnancy to a live birth following either a previous pregnancy or a previous live birth. This definition, therefore, includes women who have had a previous miscarriage or stillbirth, as well as those who already have a child.

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  • 14 Factors that can negatively affect ovulation and your fertility

    Take a read of the most common factors that affect ovulation and your fertility..................

     

    Age

    It is a well-known fact that the older you are the more difficult it is to conceive. The average age of the menopause and the end of a woman’s reproductive life is around 52 years of age. However even a decade or so before she may experience fertility problems, as her cycles become less regular and the quality of her eggs decline. Tragically, some women experience a premature menopause as early as their 30’s or 40’s.

    There is no definitive age when fertility starts to decline and every woman is different, however it’s important for women of any age who are struggling to conceive to get advice sooner rather than later.

    Hereditary factors

    Women will generally experience the menopause around the same time that their mother did. So, ask your mother how old she was when she went through the menopause. This will give you a good idea of when it may happen for you so you can make decisions on when to start a family or to seek help if time is running out.

    Smoking

    Everyone knows that you shouldn’t smoke when you are pregnant, but few women realise the impact that smoking can have on your fertility. The shocking facts are that smoking ages your ovaries by 10 years and smoking can adversely affect the ease in which the egg travels down the fallopian tubes to meet the sperm.

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  • Does being overweight affect my fertility?

    If you have been trying to conceive for a little while, it’s very likely that you’ve either read or been told that being overweight makes falling pregnant more difficult. However, then you walk down the street and what do you see? You see a woman who looks as though she has a problem with her weight, pushing a pram. Your first thought is ‘This isn’t fair’’ and then probably something like ‘’Why can she get pregnant when she’s overweight and I can’t? Your feelings of frustration deepen and your sadness grows.

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    You may have experienced the upsetting scenario when your doctor says that you need to ‘’Go away and lose weight and come back when you’ve got your BMI down to 30/35’’. You leave the hospital feeling disappointed and unsupported. No one likes to be told they are overweight. Least of all women and even less so a woman who is trying to conceive

    I’ve heard these stories from my patients over and over again. Trust me, if you’ve been in one of those scenarios, you are far from alone.

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  • Smoking BEFORE you plan to get pregnant can affect your fertility!

    Smoking BEFORE you plan to get pregnant can affect your fertility!

    By Kate Davies, RN, BSc(Hons), FP Cert - Fertility Nurse

    Everyone knows that smoking is bad for your health, but have you really given any consideration to how smoking affects both you and your partner’s fertility?
     
     

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  • The cost of infertility

    By Kate Davies, RN, BSc(Hons), FP Cert - Fertility Nurse

    When faced with problems conceiving the furthest thought from your mind is money. Disappointment is most likely to be your initial feeling, followed quickly by anger, resentment and confusion. This is the emotional cost of infertility; an all-consuming state of utter despair. However after a while you pick yourself up, dust yourself down and begin to look at your options.
     
    You probably think ‘We’ll do whatever it takes to have a baby’ but inevitably the reality of your situation creeps in and tough financial considerations have to be made. Have you considered how much you would be prepared to spend in order to conceive?
     
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